During pandemic, auto crashes are down throughout California, but not in Bakersfield-Kern County

May 27, 2020 | 9:25 am


The coronavirus pandemic has affected all aspects of our lives, including driving habits. In fact, traffic volume is down throughout California’s roadways, which has resulted in fewer collisions and arrests for driving under the influence across the state.

Unfortunately, the same can’t be said for Bakersfield and Kern County.

While California saw an 88% reduction in the number of people killed in crashes and a 62% decrease in the number of people injured in crashes from March 19 to April 30 this year versus last year, the Bakersfield area saw a 33% increase in fatal crashes from 8 in 2019 to 12 in 2020 during this same time period, according to data from the California Highway Patrol’s Statewide Integrated Traffic Records System (SWITRS).

California also saw a 75% decrease in the number of crashes, and the total number of truck-involved collisions also saw a 60% drop, with fatal truck-involved crashes down 88%, according to CHP. The number of DUI arrests made by officers has decreased during March and April in California, from 7,224 in 2019 to 4,223 in 2020; a decrease of 42%.

Even more, the open roads have left some drivers feeling the need for speed. CHP officers issued 2,738 citations for speeding in excess of 100 miles per hour between March 19 and April 30, which is an increase of 46% from last year. Locally, the CHP’s Central Division, which covers the Central Valley, saw a 61% increase in speeding over 100 mph tickets during the same time period.​

According to Verra Mobility, a photo enforcement company with 4,000 camera locations in the United States, speed violations were up 16%, and the number of vehicles going at least 20 miles per hour over the local limit increased 40% in April compared with the same month last year.

The surge in speeding and reckless behavior on our roadways has led to increased patrolling on local highways. A first offense for a 100 mph citation could lead to a $1,000 fine, loss of license for 30 days, or worse — speeding endangers lives of everyone on the road.

“During this time, taking care of yourself and one another goes beyond wearing a mask and physical distancing. We all have a responsibility care for each other on our roadways, too,” said David Cohn, managing partner and personal injury attorney at Chain | Cohn | Stiles. “Please Slow down, take your time, pay attention while driving, and drive sober.”

Across the country too, U.S. highways have gotten emptier and they have also been more deadly, data from the National Safety Council shows. The fatality rate per mile driven went up by 14% compared with March 2019. The number of miles driven dropped 18.6% in March compared with the same month last year, but the death rate per 100 million vehicle miles driven was 1.22 in March, up from 1.07 in March 2019.

Chain | Cohn | Stiles reminds drivers to please slow down, never drive while under the influence, and always wear seat belts. And if you are involved in a car accident, follow these three steps:

1) Obtain the name, address, insurance information, vehicle identification number (VIN) and driver’s license number of any and all persons involved in the accident, as well as the names, addresses, and telephone numbers of all witnesses.

2) Make sure that a report is filed with the police, sheriff, or highway patrol, but do not talk to anyone else, especially insurance adjusters, about the accident or sign anything without first consulting an attorney.

3) Seek medical attention immediately and explain to your physician or surgeon all of the symptoms and complaints you have been feeling since the accident occurred.

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If you or someone you know is injured in an accident at the fault of someone else, or injured on the job no matter whose fault it is, contact the attorneys at Chain | Cohn | Stiles by calling (661) 323-4000, or fill out a free consultation form at chainlaw.com.

Electrical Safety: Take these precautions to reduce injury risks at home and work

May 20, 2020 | 6:00 am


May is National Electrical Safety Month, and a time to raise awareness on steps that can be taken to reduce the number of electrically-related fires, fatalities, injuries, and property loss — at work and at home.

Did you know that the United States sees nearly 200 electrical-related fatalities per year, according to Occupational Safety and Health Administration. And for every 13 electrical injuries, one worker dies due to an accident. At home, electrical fires claim the lives of 485 Americans each year and injure 2,305 more, according to the United States Fire Administration. Some of the fires are caused by electrical system failures and appliance defects, but many are caused by the misuse and poor maintenance of electrical appliances, incorrectly installed wiring, and overloaded circuits and extension cords.

Over the years, Chain | Cohn | Stiles has helped hundreds of electrical workers in Kern County move forward after suffering injuries at work.

“Taking steps in advance can save you from an emergency situation,” said David Cohn, managing partner and personal injury attorney at Chain | Cohn | Stiles. “Taking precautions can reduce risks, and keep your family and property safe. Really, electrical safety should be a year-round priority.”

Here are some tips on how to stay safe:

 

AT HOME & INDOORS

  • Never repair electrical cords or equipment unless qualified and authorized. Cords that are frayed or damaged should be removed and replaced immediately, not spliced or taped.
  • Don’t overload electric outlets.
  • Don’t run cords under carpets or rug,  and don’t tack or nail cords to walls or floors.
  • Keep electric appliances and tools away from water. Remember that water and electricity do not mix.
  • Minimize the use of extension cords and never plug two extension cords together.
  • Use light bulbs that correspond with the recommended wattage on the fixture. Check the sticker on the fixture to determine the maximum wattage bulb to use.
  • Unplug appliances before cleaning, and when not in use.
  • Use a Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) or extra protection. They automatically shut off power to the outlet, protecting you from electrical shock and preventing fires.
  • When leaving laptop computers, iPads, and cell phones charging, have them on a solid surface such as a desk or countertop. Leaving them on a bed, couch or chair can cause them to overheat and catch the material on fire.
  • Have a licensed electrician examine your electrical system every 10 years. All electrical work should be done by a licensed electrician who has first obtained a permit when required.

 

OUTDOORS

  • Do not let children climb trees near power lines.
  • Keep kites, model airplanes, and metallic balloons away from power lines.
  • Avoid overhead and underground power lines when you use a ladder, work on the roof, clean a pool, prune trees or dig in the yard.
  • Never touch a downed power line, or anything in contact with it. Assume any downed power line is energized. If you see a downed power line, call 9-1-1 immediately.
  • Call before you dig: Whether you’re a homeowner planting a tree or a contractor excavating a subdivision, you must call 8-1-1 at least two days before you dig. It’s free, it’s safe and it’s the law. A specialist may come to your location and identify underground lines for you.
  • If an overhead wire falls across your vehicle while you are driving, stay inside the vehicle and continue to drive away from the line. If the engine stalls, do not leave your vehicle. Warn people not to touch the vehicle or the wire. Call or ask someone to call the local electric utility company and emergency services.

For more information and safety tips, visit the Electrical Safety Foundation International website at esfi.org.

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If you or someone you know is injured in an accident at the fault of someone else, or injured on the job no matter whose fault it is, contact the attorneys at Chain | Cohn | Stiles by calling (661) 323-4000, or fill out a free consultation form at chainlaw.com.

More bicycles are on our roadways during the COVID-19 pandemic, and more accidents (how to stay safe)

May 13, 2020 | 6:00 am


With the COVID-19 coronavirus crisis restricting much of everyday life, limiting movement to essential trips for food and medicine and a daily outings for exercise, bikes have emerged as savior for many.

Bicycles have become a welcome tool for this pandemic as a way to quickly get around and get exercise while staying a safe distance from everyone else. In some cities, cycling has increased by more than 150% during the outbreak, according to the World Resource Institute.

Unfortunately, also increasing are injuries from cycling. In New York, authorities reported a nearly 50% jump in cyclists injuries during March. The rise in cyclist injuries comes as the number of people on the road overall is decreasing as more people work and are staying put inside their homes. It appears that driver inattention and failure to yield, and some form of driver error are all to blame.

Locally, The Bakersfield Californian reported that that bicycle shops and bike repair businesses are doing well at a time when many retailers are struggling or shut down entirely. The California Highway Patrol recently issued a reminder to motorists to share the road safely with bicyclists, who may be out in larger numbers as a result of the stay-at-home order due to the coronavirus. In fact, local CHP offices are giving out helmets to children, and parents or guardians. According to the National Safety Council, cyclists who wear a helmet reduce their risk of head injury by an estimated 60 percent. California law requires cyclists under 18 to wear a helmet.

The increase also comes at a time of another sobering statistic: From 2016 through 2018 in California, more cyclists died in traffic accidents across the state than during any three-year period in the past 25 years, according to California Healthline. Surging popularity of bike shares and fitness cycling are part of the reasons.

At the time, and especially during this month’s National Bike Month, Chain | Cohn | Stiles reminds everyone — bicyclists, pedestrians, and motorists — to stay alert on our roads to keep everyone safe. Read below for quick tips of how we can all stay safe:

RULES OF THE ROAD

Here are bike laws you need to know to pedal safely and legally, courtesy of the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition:

  • Pedestrians have the right of way: In the crosswalk or not, bike riders and drivers are required to yield to pedestrians.
  • Stop behind the crosswalk: Leave crosswalks free and clear for pedestrians. Always stop behind the line.
  • Mind the signs and lights: Stop at stop signs and obey red lights, just like all other vehicles.
  • Stay on the streets: It’s illegal to ride on the sidewalk.
  • Go with the flow: Ride the same direction as traffic. Walk your bike on the sidewalk if you find yourself on the wrong block of a one-way street.
  • Take the lane: If you’re next to parked cars or you’re riding in a narrow lane — if you feel safer, take the lane and ride outside the door zone.
  • It’s OK to leave the bike lane: If you feel safer outside the bike lane, you can ride in other vehicle travel lanes. Merge when safe and signal when changing lanes.
  • Light up the night: Reflectors and a front white light are required by law. We recommend you use a rear light as well.
  • Keep an ear clear: Even when using hands-free devices, bike riders and drivers are required to keep one ear free of headphones.
  • Be a friend to disabled neighbors: Sometimes people with disabilities need access to the curb. Paratransit carriers (including taxis) may have to enter the bikeway to drop them off. Be a good neighbor and give them room.
  • Pass on the left: Although bike lanes are often on the right side of the road, people biking and driving are required to pass on the left.

And here are a few tips to ensure the safety of everyone on the road:

  • Drivers should look behind them before making a turn at an intersection, especially if crossing into a designated bike lane.
  • Drivers should use extra caution backing up or leaving a parking space.
  • Bicyclists should go with the flow of traffic and let faster traffic pass.
  • Bicyclists should make themselves visible and wear brightly colored clothing.
  • Bicyclists are advised to use lights from dusk to dawn (front white light and rear red flashing light or reflectors).
  • Bicyclists should always wear a helmet and use hand signals when turning or stopping.
  • Both drivers and bicyclists should avoid distractions like using their cell phone.

 

CRASH CHECKLIST

If you are involved in a collision while riding a bicycle, it’s important to know the steps to follow to ensure that you receive fair response from the police and collect information you may need for future legal issues. Even if you are not injured, follow this checklist as injuries can come up later.

Immediately after a crash

  • Tell the driver to stay until the police arrive. If they refuse to stay or don’t provide ID, get their and the car’s description, vehicle’s license plate # and state of issue.
  • Call (or ask someone to call) 9-1-1, and ask for the police to come to the scene.
  • Get name and contact info for any witnesses. Ask them to remain on the scene until police arrive, if possible.
  • Ask for the driver’s license and insurance card. Write down name, address, date of birth, and insurance information.

When the police arrive

  • Ask them to take an incident report.
  • Get reporting police officer’s name and badge number.
  • If you’ve been doored, ask the officer to cite the motorist for dooring.
  • Ask the officers to speak to witnesses, if possible.
  • While a doctor’s report of your injury is important for insurance and/or legal action, you do not need to take an ambulance.

In the days after the crash

  • Contact witnesses to ask them to email you their version of what happened while it’s fresh in their mind. Email yourself a description of what happened with relevant information and capture as much detail as you can.
  • Take good photos of your injuries and any bike damage. Get an estimate from a bike shop before making repairs.
  • Request a copy of the incident report from the police.
  • Contact an attorney who has experience with bicycle accidents.

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If you or someone you know is injured in an accident at the fault of someone else, or injured on the job no matter whose fault it is, contact the attorneys at Chain | Cohn | Stiles by calling (661) 323-4000, or fill out a free consultation form at chainlaw.com.

Dog bite prevention during the pandemic, and beyond

April 15, 2020 | 10:09 am


With more people taking walks around their neighborhoods and exercising outdoors to take a break from stay-at-home life during the conoravirus pandemic, it’s more important than ever to be aware of potential dangers while outside.

And that includes dangerous dogs or other animals roaming our streets.

This week is National Dog Bite Prevention Week, aimed to help educate the public and reduce the 4.5 million dog bites per year, most of them against children and a vast majority preventable. More than 800,000 people each year receive medical attention for dog bites, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control.

“Any dog can bite: big or small, young or old,” said Matt Clark, senior partner and personal injury attorney at Chain | Cohn | Stiles. “Even the sweetest pet can bite under certain circumstances. Let’s make sure we all do our part to respect pets, and they will respect us.”

 

HOW TO PREVENT DOG BITES

Most dog bites are preventable, and there are many things we can do at home and within our neighborhoods to help prevent them. But first, it’s important to know that dogs bite for a variety of reasons, including:

  • To defend itself or its territory.
  • Because they are scared or have been startled.
  • Because they feel threatened. T
  • To protect something that is valuable to them, like their puppies, food, or a toy.
  • Because they aren’t feeling well. They could be sick or sore due to injury or illness and might want to be left alone.
  • During play. Avoid wrestling or playing tug-of-war with your dog. These types of activities can make your dog overly excited, which may lead to a nip or a bite.

So, what can we do to prevent dog bites?

First, socializing your pet helps your dog feel at ease in different situations. By introducing your dog to people and other animals while it’s a puppy, it feels more comfortable in different situations as it gets older. It’s also important to use a leash in public to make sure that you are able to control your dog.

Second, educate yourself and your children about how to approach a dog.

Third, it’s important to know how to avoid escalating risky situations and to understand when you should and should not interact with dogs. You should avoid petting a dog in these scenarios:

  • If the dog is not with its owner
  • If the dog is with its owner, but the owner does not give permission to pet the dog
  • If the dog is on the other side of a fence—​don’t reach through or over a fence to pet a dog
  • If a dog is sleeping or eating
  • If a dog is sick or injured
  • If a dog is resting with her puppies or seems very protective of her puppies and anxious about your presence
  • If a dog is playing with a toy
  • If a dog is growling or barking
  • If a dog appears to be hiding or seeking time alone

Lastly, reading a dog’s body language also can be helpful. Just like people, dogs rely on body gestures, postures and vocalizations to express themselves and communicate. Dogs can give us helpful clues as to whether a dog is feeling stressed, frightened, or threatened.

Note: This year’s pandemic has brought on a new element. The U.S. Postal Service reported that with more children at home during school closures, incidents of dog attacks on postal carriers have a tendency to increase. When kids rush out the door to see a mail, a household dog often follows behind, leaving the carrier vulnerable to a dog attack. Pet owners, the service reported, are asked to wait for the carrier to leave before opening the door to get their mail or package. Dogs can slip between an owner’s legs while the door is open and attacking the carrier. The service recommends restraining dogs as mail carriers make personal deliveries.

 

WHAT TO DO IF YOU’RE BITTEN

If you are bitten by a dog, here is a checklist of things you should do:

  • If the dog’s owner is present, request proof of rabies vaccination, and get the owner’s name and contact information.
  • Clean the bite wound with soap and water as soon as possible.
  • Consult your doctor immediately or go to the emergency room if it’s after office hours.
  • Contact the dog’s veterinarian to check vaccination records.

And if your dog happens to bite someone, remember that you are responsible to help the person who has been bitten and to remove your dog from the situation.

  • Restrain your dog immediately.
  • Separate your dog from the scene of the bite.
  • Try to confine your dog in a safe place.
  • Check on the bite victim’s condition.
  • Make sure that the wounds are washed with soap and water.
  • Encourage the bite victim to seek professional medical advice to check on the seriousness of the wound and the risk of rabies or other infections.
  • Call 9-1-1 if a response by paramedics is needed.
  • Provide important information.
  • Give the bite victim – or others who are with the person at the time of the incident – your name, address and phone number, as well as information about your dog’s most recent rabies vaccination.
  • Obey local rules and laws regarding reporting of dog bites.
  • Talk to your veterinarian for advice about dog behavior that will help prevent similar incidents in the future.

 

DOG BITE CASES

The lawyers at Chain | Cohn | Stiles have decades of experience handling dog bite cases on behalf of victims.

Most recently, Chain | Cohn | Stiles filed a claim on behalf of the family of a second-grade student who was bitten on the face by a dog while in her classroom. Leilani, 8, suffered severe lacerations and tearing to her face when she was attacked by one of two large dogs visiting her classroom on May 9 at Wayside Elementary School (Bakersfield City School District) in south Bakersfield. The dogs belonged to a volunteer reader from the Kern County Superintendent of Schools Office.

The family alleges in the claim that Bakersfield City School District and the Kern County Superintendent of Schools Office negligently allowed the volunteer reader to bring into the classroom two dogs, and failed to supervise the dogs in a safe manner. As a result, Leilani suffered severe injuries. The family further alleges that the dog owner is strictly liable pursuant to California Civil Code section 3342 (Dog Bite Statute).

This case is a warning to school officials and parents toward allowing animals near young students on school campuses.

In another case, Chain | Cohn | Stiles resolved a lawsuit in 2016 on behalf of a Bakersfield woman for $2 million in what was the largest award for a dog bite case against a public entity in California at the time, according to VerdictSearch, a verdict and settlement database.

In this case, a 21-year-old was attacked by a K-9 dog accompanying a Kern County Sheriff’s deputy while outside of a restaurant in north Bakersfield. Responding to a domestic dispute, the deputy exited his patrol vehicle and began walking toward Casey. At that time, the K-9 exited the patrol car, ran toward Casey and began biting her for 60 to 90 seconds. Casey suffered several major bite wounds to her leg.

Investigation found that the K-9 escaped from its holding kennel in the back of the patrol car due to a mechanical defect inside of the car. The deputy agreed that the K-9 should not have been let out of the patrol car. In addition, the K-9 failed to respond to commands from the deputy to cease attacking.

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If you or someone you know is bitten or attacked by a dog, please contact the attorneys at Chain | Cohn | Stiles by calling (661) 323-4000, or fill out a free consultation form at chainlaw.com.

New mobile app gives Kern County residents free resources, immediate access to Chain | Cohn | Stiles

April 8, 2020 | 6:00 am


More than half a century ago, Chain | Cohn | Stiles pioneered “Group Law Services” to provide quality legal help for working people in Kern County, especially those who belong to local credit unions, labor unions and service organizations.

Institutions who partner with the law firm include Alta One Federal Credit Union, California Correctional Peace Officers Association, Central Labor Council, and Valley Strong Credit Union, among others. As part of Group Law Services, members of these institutions and their immediate family members are entitled to free initial consultations, reduced fees if ever in need of help from our law firm, special seminars and workshops, and other benefits.

And this year, Chain | Cohn | Stiles has unveiled a mobile app allowing members exclusive access to legal resources and our attorneys 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

“Our law firm has served our community for more than 85 years. It’s important we continue serving those who need help the best way we can,” said David Cohn, managing partner and personal injury attorney at Chain | Cohn | Stiles. “It’s also vital we make ourselves available whenever it is our community needs us most. With this new mobile app, we can be reached at any time, and we’ll be ready to help. Today and always, we are here for you, Kern County.”

To access the mobile app click here, or visit chainlaw.app. (The app requires a username and password. To receive one, please contact marketing director Jorge Barrientos at (661) 334-4948, or email him at jbarrientos@chainlaw.com.)

The mobile app provides several features for those whose institutions subscribe to the exclusive service. They include:

  • A news section featuring the latest updates from relevant laws, our community, and happenings from Chain | Cohn | Stiles.
  • A “Frequently Asked Questions” section to get the answers to some of the most common general legal questions we receive at our law firm. This section also includes videos of answers courtesy of Chain | Cohn | Stiles senior partner and veteran attorney Matthew Clark.
  • And the biggest benefit, the “24/7” section gives users access to legal help whenever it is they may need it. Users can call, chat, or text our office any time for immediate help using this service.

If you are interested in accessing this mobile app for your company’s employees, customers, or others, please contact marketing director Jorge Barrientos at (661) 334-4948, or email him at jbarrientos@chainlaw.com.

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If you or someone you know is injured in an accident at the fault of someone else, or injured on the job no matter whose fault it is, contact the attorneys at Chain | Cohn | Stiles by calling (661) 323-4000, or fill out a free consultation form at chainlaw.com.

How personal injury and workers’ compensation systems work together

March 25, 2020 | 6:00 am


Note: Veteran workers’ compensation attorney James Yoro recently spoke at the Kern County Paralegal Association luncheon about the relationship between workers’ compensation law and personal injury law. Chain | Cohn | Stiles law firm focuses on only personal injury and workers’ compensation cases. Below is a portion of Yoro’s presentation.

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If you have been injured due to the fault of both your employer as well as a third party, then you may be entitled to further compensation from the third party. Since Chain | Cohn | Stiles practices law in both areas, the lawyers and staff are uniquely situated to handle both aspects of these cases.

To explain a little further:

  • A personal injury claim is a civil lawsuit that is pursued and processed through superior, appellate and supreme courts, and is a part of the civil justice system, which allows a person to sue another person or party for damages as a result of negligent conduct that caused certain damages to that person. The outcome and any potential recovery is determined at the end of the case by way of dispute resolution (settlement, mediation, or arbitration) or through litigation (trial). Damages can include:
    • Cost of medical treatment provided and potential future medical needs.
    • Loss of earnings and future earning capacity.
    • Potential loss of consortium.
    • Non-economic damages (typically referred as pain and suffering). Recovery is a fluid process up until a jury verdict is returned and upheld on appeal.
  • A workers’ compensation claim is an administrative claim that is pursued through an administrative process governed by the Workers’ Compensation Appeals Board, and if legal disputes arise, the appellate and supreme courts. It is categorized as an administrative process because the workers’ compensation system was created by statute and designed to be a benefit delivery system. If disputes arise, they are adjudicated by a Workers’ Compensation Appeals Board, and the system can become adversarial. A case can be resolved at any point in the process or it can remain unresolved for many years. A case can be resolved and yet remain open for the provision of certain benefits for the person’s lifetime. If there are no disputed issues as to the legitimacy of a claim, benefits as defined by statute are to be provided without delay. A workers’ compensation formula is applied for employer negligence calculation as applied to total damages, not including recovery. The benefits include:
    • Medical treatment and associated benefits.
    • Monetary benefits.
    • Vocational rehabilitation (that are set and defined by statute)
    • Temporary total disability.
    • Permanent disability.

One rule to note: A workers compensation insurance carrier that has provided benefits to an injured worker who has a personal injury case is not entitled to a recovery of their lien or application of the credit to the extent of their percentage of fault if the employers conduct contributed to the cause of the injury.

To illustrate a couple of examples of how personal injury and workers’ compensation cases work together, here are a few hypothetical scenarios.

 

SCENARIO 1

Ann is a UPS delivery driver, and one day while driving down a Main Street on the way to deliver a package, she is broadsided by a Chevron tanker truck that has gone through a stop sign. Ann suffers serious personal injuries and requires medical treatment including hospitalization, surgery and time off from work to recover.

Ann files a workers’ compensation claim with her employer who is insured for worker’s compensation by Cal. Comp. Ann hires an attorney to pursue a personal injury against Chevron. Cal. Comp. hires an attorney to pursue its subrogation interests and files a complaint in intervention in Ann’s personal injury lawsuit.

At the mandatory settlement conference in the personal injury case, Chevron settles with all parties for $1 million. As of the date of the settlement conference, Cal. Comp. has paid out $150,000 in both medical and monetary benefits to Ann. Because of her level of permanent disability percentage, Cal. Comp. still owes an additional $60,000 and may have to provide her with another surgery that could cost $40,000 in her unresolved workers’ comp. case. Ann nets $550,000 from her personal injury case.

A few questions arise:

  • Who got what and why?
  • Is Ann entitled to get the additional $60,000 that Cal. Comp. owes her and get them to pay for her surgery? Why or why not?
  • What if Cal. Comp. did not hire an attorney and did not file a complaint in intervention and only served a lien on Ann’s personal injury attorney? Then what would Cal. Comp. get? What would Ann get?

 

SCENARIO 2

Ann is a UPS delivery driver. One day while driving down a Main Street on the way to deliver a package, she is broadsided by a converted taco truck that has blown a stop sign. Ann suffers serious personal injuries and requires medical treatment including hospitalization, surgery and time off from work in order to recover.

The owner of the Taco truck is Don Quixote who has a $100,000 auto policy with GEICO. Ann files a workers’ compensation claim with her employer who is insured for workers’ compensation by Cal. Comp. Ann hires an attorney to pursue a personal injury claim against Don Quixote. Cal. Comp. does not hire a subrogation attorney and only sends Ann’s attorney a lien.

Upon presentation of the current medicals on GEICO by Ann’s personal injury attorney, GEICO decides to tender their policy. At the time of the tender, Cal. Comp. has paid out $100,000 in medical and temporary total disability. Its future obligation to Ann is estimated to be another $200,000 with $60,000 to $70,000 estimated for her permanent disability benefit. Cal. Comp. notifies Ann’s personal injury attorney that it wants payment of its lien.

  • What strategies can be employed for Ann’s benefit?

 

SCENARIO 3

Ann is a UPS delivery driver. One day while driving down a Main Street on the way to deliver a package, she is broadsided by a Chevron tanker truck that has blown a stop sign. When the CHP officer interviews Ann, she tells him that as she approached the intersection she saw the Chevron truck out of the corner of her eye, and thought that the truck was going too fast to stop, so she started to apply her brakes but she couldn’t stop in time. Upon inspection, the CHP officer notes that the UPS truck’s brakes are badly worn. Ann suffers serious personal injuries and requires medical treatment including hospitalization, surgery and time off from work in order to recover.

Ann files a workers’ compensation claim with her employer who is insured for workers’ compensation by Cal. Comp. Ann hires an attorney to pursue a personal injury claim against Chevron. Chevron’s attorney obtains the UPS trucks maintenance records and discovers that UPS failed to bring this
particular truck in for its last routine maintenance inspection which was scheduled two months before the accident. Chevron hires an accident reconstruction expert who says that Ann would have had enough time to avoid the accident had the brakes been working properly. Ann’s attorney hires an accident reconstruction expert, who says that it is too speculative to say that Ann would have had enough time to avoid the accident.

As of the date of the mandatory settlement conference for the personal injury case, Cal. Comp has paid out $150,000 in both medical and monetary benefits to Ann. Because of her level of permanent disability percentage, Cal. Comp still owes an additional $60,000 and may have to provide her with another surgery that could cost $40,000 in her unresolved workers’ compensation case. The full damage value of the case is about $1 million. The case settles for $850,000, and Ann nets $540,000.

  • What if anything is Cal. Comp. entitled to recover?
  • Would it make a difference if Cal. Comp. had an attorney?
  • What strategies can Ann’s attorneys use to get the best result for Ann?

 

SCENARIO 4

Ann is a UPS delivery driver. One day while driving down a main street on the way to deliver a package, she is broadsided by a converted Taco truck that has blown a stop sign. Ann suffers serious personal injuries and requires medical treatment including hospitalization, surgery and time off from work in order to recover.

The owner of the Taco truck is Don Quixote who has a $100,000 auto policy with GEICO. Ann files a workers’ compensation claim with her employer who is insured for workers’ compensation by Cal. Comp. Ann hires an attorney to pursue a personal injury claim against Don Quixote. Cal. Comp. does not hire a subrogation attorney and only sends Ann’s attorney a lien.

Upon presentation of the current medicals on GEICO by Ann’s personal injury attorney, GEICO decides to tender their policy. At the time of the tender, Cal. Comp. has paid out $100,000 in Medical and temporary total disability. Its future obligation to Ann is estimated to be another $200,000, with $60,000 to $70,000 estimated for her permanent disability benefit.

Ann’s personal injury attorney discovers that UPS has an Uninsured / Underinsured policy on all of its trucks for $1 million. Cal. Comp. notifies Ann’s personal injury attorney that it wants payment of its lien and credit for any and all recovery that Ann obtains.

  • Is Cal. Comp. entitled to recover its lien and get credit?
  • For how much?
  • What strategies can be employed for Ann’s benefit?

 

While these are hypothetical situations in which personal injury and workers’ compensation law intersect, similar cases are very real. And each case presents its own questions and challenges, ones which the workers’ compensation and personal injury lawyers at Chain | Cohn | Stiles has confronted time and time again.

If you or someone you know is injured in an accident at the fault of someone else, or injured on the job no matter whose fault it is, contact the attorneys at Chain | Cohn | Stiles by calling (661) 323-4000, or fill out a free consultation form at chainlaw.com.

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*NOTICE: Making a false or fraudulent Workers’ Compensation claim is a felony subject to up to 5 years in a prison or a fine of up to $150,000 or double the value of the fraud, whichever is greater, or by both imprisonment and fine.

New state Assembly Bill targets street racing, increasing penalties for dangerous activity

March 11, 2020 | 10:34 am


Outrage had been building in Bakersfield over widespread incidents of street racing, and it reached a boiling point after an alleged street racing crash killed a Bakersfield woman and injured two children riding with her in a minivan.

The issue hits close to home for Chain | Cohn | Stiles, which is representing one of the children who suffered major injuries in that November 2019 crash that killed 58-year-old Maria Blaney Navarro. Reckless driving is a nuisance in our neighborhoods at the very least, but it injures and kills too many innocent people each year.

It’s why Chain | Cohn | Stiles is in full support of a new state Assembly Bill 2565 introduced by Assemblyman Vince Fong of Bakersfield, and co-authored by Assemblywoman Laura Friedman of Glendale, that would bring additional penalties to those who publicly exhibit street racing behaviors.

“I authored this bill in response to what our local law enforcement officials have conveyed as a troubling and problematic trend in our neighborhoods,” Fong said in the statement. “We need to increase the penalties for illegal street racing activities to send a message that this activity will not be tolerated.”

Under AB 2565, acts such as engine-revving and burning out vehicle tires in front of a group of spectators could lead to suspension of a driver’s license. The bill would provide an additional tool for law enforcement as officials look to curtail street racing in Kern County and throughout the state.

Bakersfield Police arrested 50-year-old Ronald Dean Pierce in connection with the death of Navarro, and faces a second-degree murder charge, as well as suspicion of driving under the influence of alcohol, reckless driving causing an injury, and participating in an illegal speed contest. Police said he was racing a Mustang against another vehicle in southwest Bakersfield when he lost control of the vehicle and struck the van not involved in the race. The impact caused the van to spin out of control into oncoming traffic, where it was then hit by a crane truck, killing Navarro and injuring two grandchildren.

For years, residents in southwest Bakersfield had complained to police about the prevalence of street racing and parking-lot gatherings. After the fatal crash, police responded with overtime traffic enforcement targeting street racers.

Currently, street racing in California is a misdemeanor with penalties including a jail sentence, fine between $355 and $1,000, community service, suspension of your driver’s license, and impounding of vehicles. However, prior convictions for street racing or if someone is injured in the race could face “enhanced” penalties including more jail sentence, fines, and suspensions.

The Assembly Bill is pending referral to a policy committee for a hearing in the coming weeks.

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If you or someone you know is injured in an accident at the fault of someone else, or injured on the job no matter whose fault it is, contact the attorneys at Chain | Cohn | Stiles by calling (661) 323-4000, or fill out a free consultation form at chainlaw.com.

Pedestrian deaths reach 30-year high in the U.S. with California, Kern County seeing alarming accident rates

March 4, 2020 | 10:56 am


Pedestrian deaths in the United States have hit a 30-year high, according to new data, and California is seeing a jump in death rates that are well above national averages.

In fact, pedestrian deaths in California jumped 12% in the first half of last year, well above the national average increase of 3%, according to a report from the Governors Highway Safety Association, a non-profit that works to improve roadway safety. In all, more than 6,500 pedestrians were killed in 2019 in the United States, the highest number since 1988.

Some of the reasons for this increase? SUVs, drug and alcohol use, warm weather and cellphones are to blame, officials say.

Chain | Cohn | Stiles, which represents victims of pedestrian accidents, dives into the local and state issue of pedestrian safety, why we’re seeing an increase in pedestrian accidents, and what’s being done to combat the problem.

 

STATE, LOCAL PROBLEMS

Five states — California, Arizona, Texas, Georgia, and Florida — accounted for 47% of pedestrian deaths, yet these states make up 33% of the U.S. population. California had 1.31 deaths per 100,000 people. That ranked it as the ninth most dangerous state, behind New Mexico, Hawaii, Florida, South Carolina, Arizona, Louisiana and Nevada. Vermont was the safest state, with 0.18 deaths per 100,000 people.

At the same time, Bakersfield and Kern County has also seen the number of pedestrian accidents rise to an alarming rate. In a study last year, Bakersfield ranked as the seventh deadliest city in the United States for pedestrians. Between 2008 to 2017, Bakersfield saw a total of 247 pedestrian deaths, bringing the annual pedestrian fatality rate to 2.83 per 100,000 residents, according to the report titled “Dangerous By Design” by Smart Growth America. While the number of pedestrians has only increased by a mere 1 percent during the past decade, Bakersfield saw fatalities of pedestrians rise an astounding 35.4 percent.

Bakersfield was the only California city ranked in the top 23 worst cities for pedestrians, according to that study that looked at pedestrian safety in cities of different sizes, density, and rates of walking.

 

WHY?

The governors’ report noted several reasons for the uptick in pedestrian accidents and fatalities:

  • SUVs: Pedestrians struck by a large SUV are twice as likely to be killed as those hit by a car. Over the past 10 years, the number of pedestrian deaths involving SUVs went up 81%, well above the increase in passenger-car related deaths.
  • Speeding, alcohol use and other unsafe driving or pedestrian behavior: Alcohol impairment — by either the driver or pedestrian — was involved in nearly half the crashes that led to fatalities in 2018.
  • Unsafe road crossings: Over the past decade, nighttime pedestrian deaths went up 67%. Daytime fatalities were up 16%.

Warmer weather also encourages more nighttime outdoor activity and is associated with more drinking, which increases the risk of fatal pedestrian collisions, studies show.

Another reason includes smartphones, which have been a source of cognitive and visual distraction for all road users, pedestrian or otherwise. Additionally, road designs continue to be tailored to drivers only, and are not taking pedestrian safety into account, and wide lanes with high speed limits and few sidewalks are also to blame.

 

ADDRESSING THE PROBLEM

The latest report cites efforts by the state to reduce pedestrian dangers including initiatives involving classroom education, community events, presentations and workshops. These countermeasures are conducted in communities with high numbers of pedestrian-related collisions including under-served communities, older adults and school-aged children.

Coordinated efforts such as Safe Routes to School initiatives, Vision Zero campaigns and work with community-based organizations to prevent fatalities and injuries among vulnerable non-motorized road users.

Also cited in the report were California’s engineering improvements, including “using pedestrian warning signs, implementing high-visibility crosswalk markings, imposing parking restrictions to improve visibility and adjusting traffic signals at certain intersections to give pedestrians a head start before a vehicle turns.”

 

HOW TO STAY SAFE

Here are some safety tips that pedestrians and drivers can use to decrease accidents, and potentially save lives:

Drivers

  • Look out for pedestrians, especially in hard-to-see conditions such as at night or in bad weather.
  • Slow down and be prepared to stop when turning or entering a crosswalk where pedestrians are likely to be.
  • Stop at the crosswalk stop line to give drivers in other lanes an opportunity to see and yield to the pedestrians, too.
  • Be cautious when backing up; pedestrians, especially young children, can move across your path.

Pedestrians

  • Be obvious and predictable, crossing at crosswalks or intersections only, walk facing traffic and as far from traffic as possible if there is no sidewalk
  • Make eye contact with drivers; never assume a driver sees you
  • Look left-right-left before stepping into a crosswalk. Having a green light or the “WALK” signal does not mean that it is safe to cross
  • Look for cars baking up, including white backup lights or signs the vehicle is running.
  • Don’t dart out between parked cars
  • Avoid distractions. Don’t walk and use your phone at the same time
  • Wear bright clothing during the day and reflective materials at night
  • Be predictable. Follow the rules of the road, cross at crosswalks or intersections, and obey signs and signals.
  • Walk facing traffic, and if there is no sidewalk, walk as far from traffic as possible.
  • Pay attention to the traffic moving around you. This is not the time to be texting or talking on a cell phone.
  • Make eye contact with drivers as they approach. Never assume a driver sees you.
  • Wear bright clothing during the day and reflective materials (or use a flashlight) at night.
  • Look left, right, and then left again before crossing a street.

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If you or someone you know is injured in an accident at the fault of someone else, or injured on the job no matter whose fault it is, contact the attorneys at Chain | Cohn | Stiles by calling (661) 323-4000, or fill out a free consultation form at chainlaw.com.

California ranked 4th worst state to drive in the United States, according to report

February 5, 2020 | 3:37 pm


Have you had a bad driving experience lately? Well, you may not be alone.

California has been named the fourth worst state to drive in the United States, according to a new report from WalletHub, a personal finance and information website. WalletHub compared driving experiences across all 50 states to help drivers identify the states that provide the best commuting conditions. It looked at 31 factors, including four key dimensions:

  1. Cost of ownership and maintenance
  2. Traffic and infrastructure
  3. Safety
  4. Access to vehicles and maintenance.

California was found to have the highest percentage of rush hour traffic congestion, the second highest average gas prices, and the fifth highest car theft rate, according to WalletHub. On the positive side: California is reported to have the fewest days with precipitation, the most auto repair shops per capita, and the most car washes per capita.

In all, California ranked No. 47 worst state to drive. Here’s the complete breakdown:

  • Ranking of 49 for cost of ownership and maintenance.
  • Ranking of 46 for traffic and infrastructure
  • Ranking of 4 for safety
  • Ranking of 1 for access to vehicles and maintenance

According to the study, the only states worse for driving than California were Washington, Rhode Island and Hawaii. On the other hand, the best states for driving were Iowa, followed by Tennessee, North Carolina, Texas and Nebraska.

Among the data analyzed by WalletHub were from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the Federal Highway Administration. WalletHub also asked a panel of experts regarding the future cost of car ownership, electric and self-driving vehicles, and perhaps most importantly: safety. Among the comments made regarding safety, and how to reduce the number of traffic fatalities, the experts commented:

  • “Several infrastructure improvement and policy measures are found associated with the reduction in traffic fatalities including speed reduction and traffic calming measures (like raised intersections and middle islands), dedicated and protected bicycle lanes and safer pedestrian crossings. Indirect interventions like alcohol taxes and mode alternatives (night transit, taxis, ride-hailing) are related to drunk driving reduction. A combination of such measures along with educational campaigns for safe driving can assist States with reaching Vision Zero goals.
  • Banning the use of cell phones while driving with severe penalties for violators.
  • Reducing road use taxes for vehicles with sensors that prevent unsafe driving.

Other recent reports have highlighted other not-so-good California facts, including the fact that in Los Angeles, people spent 119 hours a year last year stuck in traffic, and Sacramento being home to some of the worst drivers in the country (according to a report by QuoteWizard) when looking at speeding tickets, accidents, DUIs and citations.

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If you or someone you know is injured in an accident at the fault of someone else, or injured on the job no matter whose fault it is, contact the attorneys at Chain | Cohn | Stiles by calling (661) 323-4000, or fill out a free consultation form at chainlaw.com.

New year, new laws for California drivers, police, bicyclist, and more

January 1, 2020 | 6:00 am


The New Year brings new laws to California.

For 2020, several new laws will affect roadway safety starting Jan. 1, including increased distracted driving penalties, peace officer use of deadly force, bicycle turning movements at intersections, wildlife salvage permits, and motor carrier permit rules. The following laws are relevant for Chain | Cohn | Stiles legal practices, as the law firm handles accident and injury cases.

  • Traffic control devices for bicycles (AB 1266): This new law allows bicycles to travel straight through a right or left-hand turn-only lane while at an intersection, if an official traffic control device indicates the movement is permitted. The California Department of Transportation would be required to develop standards to implement the provisions.
  • License points for distracted driving (AB 47): Current law prohibits a person from driving a motor vehicle while using a wireless telephone in a handheld manner; if found in violation, the offense is punishable by a fine. A new law will levy an additional penalty on a driver found in violation of California’s hands-free law: a point will be added on to a driver’s record for each hands-free violation occurring within 36 months of a prior conviction for the same offense.
  • Peace officer use of deadly force (AB 392): This new law revises the standards for use of deadly force by peace officers. The use of deadly force by a peace officer is justifiable when the officer reasonably believes it is necessary, amending the reasonable force standard to “objectively reasonable force.”
  • Law enforcement training (SB 230): This new law requires law enforcement agencies to rewrite use of force policy and provide mandatory training to all peace officers in order to comply with the new law.
  • Cannabis and passenger vehicles (AB 1810): California law will now prohibit the consumption of cannabis, in any manner, by passengers in a bus, taxicab, pedicab, limousine, housecars, or camper. This exemption is now only applicable to alcoholic beverages consumed by passengers in these types of vehicles.

Besides these traffic laws above, you should be aware of several other new laws in 2020 affecting the workplace, your privacy, animals, schools, and the criminal justice system.

WORKPLACE

  • Minimum wage (SB 3): The minimum wage in California goes up by one dollar to $12 an hour for workers at companies with 25 or fewer employees and to $13 an hour for workers at larger companies.
  • Hairstyles (SB 188): California becomes the first state to ban workplace and school discrimination based on a person’s natural hairstyle or hair texture. Protected hairstyles include braids, twists and locks.
  • Lactation accommodations (SB 142): This new law requires companies to provide appropriate lactation accommodations that is close to the employee’s work area, has electrical plugs and is free of intrusion.
  • Sexual harassment (SB 1343): Requires businesses with at least five employees to provide sexual harassment training to its employees within six months of being hired, and every two years after that.
  • Paid family leave (SB 83): New parents will have more time to care for their child. Benefits under Paid Family Leave will increase from six weeks to eight weeks starting on July 1, 2020.

HOUSEHOLDS

  • AB 1482: Rent control: The law limits rent increases to 5 percent each year plus inflation, but never above 10 percent total. The law does not apply to housing built in the 15 years prior. The limit is a rolling number so the date housing is excluded changes every year.
  • AB 652: Religious displays: The law prohibits landlords and homeowner associations from banning the display of religious items on entry doors or door frames. The items cannot be larger than 26 by 12 inches.
  • SB 222: Housing discrimination: This law expands existing law to protect veterans and military personnel against housing discrimination.
  • SB 30: Domestic partners: This law allows heterosexual couples to register as domestic partners instead of getting married. Currently, only heterosexual couples age 62 or older were allowed to register as domestic partners because of social security benefits. The new law could help couples with combined higher incomes avoid the federal marriage tax penalty.

PRIVACY

  • Online privacy (AB 375): The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) gives internet users more control over their data. Among other things, the law gives users the right to know what data is collected, the right to reject the sale of your information and the right to delete your data.

EDUCATION

  • School suspensions (SB 419): The law bans schools from suspending students in grades 4-8 for disrupting school activities or defying teachers and administrators. Students in grades K-3 already have this protection. High school students must wait until 2025 for the same benefit.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE

  • Juvenile hall (SB 439): Minors under 12 who commit non-violent crimes would be released to his or her parent or legal guardian instead of being sent to juvenile hall. The law does not apply to minors who commit murder, rape, or great bodily harm.
  • Human trafficking (SB 970): Operators of motels and hotels in California must provide training to teach its staff how to identify victims of human trafficking.

ANIMALS

  • Dog areas (AB 1762): The California Department of Parks and Recreation has until July 1 to establish a comprehensive list of state parks that allow dogs, including the specific areas that allow dogs and the total miles of trails that are open to dogs.

WILDFIRES

  • Public safety power shutoffs (SB 167): Requires utilities to devise plans on reducing the negative impact of planned power shutoffs to first responders and people with disabilities.
  • Tree trimming (AB 247): Gives the California Public Utilities Commission more oversight over tree trimming efforts by utilities. Power companies would have to submit timely reports on their brush and tree trimming work.
  • Wildfire warning center (SB 209): Establishes a wildfire warning center to broaden the state’s ability to predict and prepare for wildfire. The center would rely on a statewide network of automated weather stations and fire detection cameras.

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If you or someone you know is injured in an accident at the fault of someone else, or injured on the job no matter whose fault it is, contact the attorneys at Chain | Cohn | Stiles by calling (661) 323-4000, or fill out a free consultation form at chainlaw.com.

*NOTICE: Making a false or fraudulent Workers’ Compensation claim is a felony subject to up to 5 years in a prison or a fine up to $150,000 or double the value of the fraud, whichever is greater, or by both imprisonment and fine.