Chain | Cohn | Stiles participates in community ‘Real Talk’ discussions focused on race relations in America

September 16, 2020 | 10:00 am


Following the death of George Floyd while in police custody, and the nationwide protests that followed, Bakersfield College aimed to bring us all together. With the help of local media personality Danny Morrison, the college organized a full week of conversations, events, and celebrations for Juneteenth, a commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States.

BC continued with a two-week virtual series called “Real Talk” to discuss racism and violence, and ways to overcome these issues; to “Light A Candle” and “Shine A Light” so to speak.

“It is a dark and confusing time, which makes it harder to see how to move forward,” Bakersfield College President Sonya Christian wrote on her blog. “But as Bakersfield College Renegades, we owe it to our community, to our veterans, and we each owe it to George Floyd, to join together, listen with humility, and to bring light that can illuminate the way ahead.”

Chain | Cohn | Stiles was proud to join in on the conversations as well. Attorney Matt Clark joined Morrison and Bob Prater — author of “A Language of Healing for a Polarized Nation” — to discuss white peoples’ roles in the ongoing racial conversation. Topics during the discussion included the Black Lives Matter movement, white identity, white supremacy, exploitation, and reverse racism.

“We understand this is a process and that people of color and people of all religions and races and backgrounds and creeds and socioeconomic backgrounds can all come together as one,” Morrison told local media about the series.

You can watch the full discussion at this link on the Chain | Cohn | Stiles YouTube page, or below.

And you can watch all of the “Real Talk” discussions on the Danny Morrison Media Facebook page by clicking here.

———

If you or someone you know is injured in an accident at the fault of someone else, or injured on the job no matter whose fault it is, contact the attorneys at Chain | Cohn | Stiles by calling (661) 323-4000, or fill out a free consultation form at chainlaw.com.

Chain | Cohn | Stiles files lawsuit in the case of Wasco High coach convicted of sexual misconduct with student

August 26, 2020 | 10:30 am


Chain | Cohn | Stiles has filed a lawsuit against the Wasco Union High School District on behalf of a student who was the victim of sexual misconduct by an assistant football coach at the high school.

Miguel Nicholas Saldana pleaded no contest to sending sexually explicit messages to the student, was sentenced to six months in jail, must perform 720 hours of community service and register as a sex offender, according to news reports.

Saldana, who was 23 years old at the time of the offenses, was an assistant football coach at Wasco High School as well as a Kern County detentions deputy. According to Kern County Sheriff’s Office reports, Saldana sent sexually explicit messages and asked for sexual favors from the student, who was 16 years old at the time, through Snapchat. The student then reported the messages to her mother, and then to school administrators.

Chain | Cohn | Stiles filed a lawsuit against the Wasco Union High School District alleging failure to properly supervise the volunteer coach. In fact, Saldana sent messages while he was at football practice and sent sexually explicit pictures of himself while wearing Wasco High attire.

In a reprehensible component in the case, the law firm hired to defend the school district in the case — Robinson & Kellar — threatened in a letter to countersue the victim for as much as $70,000, stating the district was not responsible for the actions of the volunteer coach

“How would you interpret it?” Chain | Cohn | Stiles attorney Matt Clark told KGET News. “I mean, it’s a threat, right? There’s a ‘Back off, dismiss your lawsuit or, should you ultimately lose, we’re going to pound you to the tune of $70,000.’”

Clark argues that illegal actions took place on school property, and the school could or should reasonably have known about the behavior. The civil case is ongoing.

Chain | Cohn | Stiles is representing the victims of several other student victims of sexual misconduct while at school. The law firm filed claims on behalf of three students who were victims of sexual misconduct by a North High School equipment manager.

Edwin Rodriguez faces 13 counts of lewd or lascivious acts with a child 14 or 15 years old. Investigation reports state that Rodriguez sent sexually explicit messages to at least eight students through social media, and had sexual contact with several of them. He is in custody on $335,000 bail on the two cases. A trial has been scheduled for Sept. 18.

———

If you or someone you know is injured in an accident at the fault of someone else, injured on the job no matter whose fault it is, or know someone who has been sexually abuse or assaulted at the hands of someone in authority, contact the attorneys at Chain | Cohn | Stiles by calling (661) 323-4000, or fill out a free consultation form at chainlaw.com.

———

MEDIA COVERAGE

Reward offered for information leading to the arrest in July 22 fatal hit-and-run crash

August 5, 2020 | 6:00 am


A reward is being offered for information that leads to the arrest of the suspect responsible for the July 22 hit-and-run crash near CSU Bakersfield that killed 65-year-old Deborah Ann Geneau.

Chain | Cohn | Stiles and family of Deborah Ann Geneau is offering a $2,500 reward to the person who helps identify the driver of a 2013-2019 dark gray Nissan Sentra that is suspected to causing the crash on Stockdale Highway near Don Hart Drive. That vehicle turned into bike path parking area across from CSUB immediately after the collision, police said. It has driver’s side damage.

Anyone with information is urged to call 326-3967 or the Kern Secret Witness line at (661) 322-4040.

“I spent yesterday at the mortuary collecting my mother’s belongings, including her crushed earrings and wedding ring. I couldn’t help but think about what the driver of the other vehicle might have been doing yesterday?” said Dawn Elliott, Deborah Ann Geneau’s daughter and only child, in a statement to media. “We really just want this person to come forward, or assistance to find the person responsible.”

Bakersfield Police Department released a new video of surveillance camera angles. The angles include traffic cameras and footage from a Golden Empire Transportation bus that was in the vicinity of the crash, police said. You can view the videos by clicking here.

“At this point, all indications are that this was an accident,” said Ray Pruitt, investigator with Chain | Cohn | Stiles, in a news conference. “But a person made a decision after being involved in a fatal accident to flee the scene. Now that person has to be held accountable.”

At the news conference for media at Chain | Cohn | Stiles, husband Rick Geneau, husband of Debbie, and their daughter Dawn, shared about their loss, and pleaded with the driver who caused the collision to turn him or herself in.

Rick met Debbie met when they were both 14 years old. At the time of Debbie’s death, they had had been married for 45 years.

“You see these lines on my face, they’re not from old age. They’re timelines that I’ve spent with my wife,” Rick Geneau told media. We all miss her deeply … I thought I was the strength of the family. Come to find out she was my strength.”

Our community — friends and strangers — have reached out to the family since the accident. The family is grateful for the outpouring of love, condolences, and support, Rick Geneau said. A GoFundMe page has been set up to pay for funeral expenses. Click here to access that page.

Rick Geneau, in speaking through media, said if the driver turned themselves in, he would stand beside them in court and ask for leniency.

“But if you don’t turn yourself in, I’ll be in court also and I’ll be seeking full prosecution to the max,” he said.

Dawn Elliott told media she feels she’s had to take on her mother’s role and be the strength of the family during this time.

“You’ve not only taken my mom’s life, you’ve taken a piece of all of our lives.”

———

CRASH MEDIA COVERAGE

 

REWARD MEDIA COVERAGE

Chain | Cohn | Stiles attorney Matt Clark discusses COVID-19 outbreak at local skilled nursing facility, and how to protect loved ones

May 6, 2020 | 10:05 am


A local skilled nursing facility is experiencing a COVID-19 outbreak affecting staff and residents alike, and Chain | Cohn | Stiles spoke with media on what people can do to protect their loved ones.

Kingston Healthcare Center, a skilled nursing facility in southwest Bakersfield, has reported 70 positive cases of the novel coronavirus as of May 5, according to data from the California Department of Public Health. The Kern County Department of Public Health said the facility requested immediate help with staffing shortages, and healthcare professionals throughout the state were sent to assist the facility.

The nursing home in a statement to media said they are working with health officials to manage confirmed cases. The facility said they’ve increased their housekeeping services and currently have appropriate personal protective equipment for staff.

“California Department of Public Health is on-site daily at the center and working together with center staff to ensure infection control process are being followed and assisting with some staffing needs,” according to the statement

Matthew Clark, Chain | Cohn | Stiles elder abuse and elder neglect attorney and senior partner, shared with 23ABC News that families with loved ones in the Kingston facility have reached out to the law firm about the quality of care since the COVID pandemic. He says over the last three years his firm has had around a half dozen cases against the facility.

“… Any case we’ve had against Kingston or any other elder care facility for that matter, it almost results from inadequate staffing. It’s an inadequate amount of staffing that leads to poor patient care. Poor patient care leads to poor patient outcomes. Poor patient outcomes especially in the elder care world often times leads to death,” Clark said in an interview with 23ABC.

23ABC reported in April that documents showed the California Department of Public Health cited the Kingston Health Care Facility more than 14 separate times since 2015. Within the last six months they were also cited with a Double-A citation, which is considered one of the most serious violations.

KGET-17 News also reported that Kingston has been sued six times since 2017, with allegations including medical malpractice, elder abuse and neglect and wrongful death. Many of those cases have been filed by Chain | Cohn | Stiles.

Clark shared with viewers that the best way for people to review nursing home conduct and reports is my visiting Medicare.gov. Users can research any skilled nursing facility, and check ratings and staffing ratios.

Kingston’s profile is now listed as a “Special Focus Facility.” According to the site this means the nursing home has had a history of persistent poor quality of care.

As of May 5, Kern County is reporting 1,055 positive cases of COVID-19 and 11 deaths, according to Kern County Public Health Services Department.

UPDATE (MAY 11, 2020): Families of residents at Kingston, as well as staff members, are speaking out about conditions at the skilled nursing facility, and seeking justice. A certified nursing assistant said they were not given PPE equipment until about a “two weeks ago,” and were working 16-hour shifts.

UPDATE (JUNE 2, 2020): The Kern County Board of Supervisors moved forward with a plan to designate an accountability officer from the Kern County Emergency Services to oversee issues at the state-regulated nursing care faculties.

———

If you or someone you know experiences elder abuse or neglect, please contact the attorneys at Chain | Cohn | Stiles by calling (661) 323-4000, or visit the law firm’s specialized website focused on elder abuse at bakersfieldelderabuse.com.

To report cases of abuse locally, whether it is on your own behalf or that of someone you know, please call Adult Protective Services or the Long-Term Care Ombudsman:

  • Adult Protective Services responds to reports from individuals, concerned citizens, social service and health providers, and law enforcement representatives about developmental disabled adults, physically and mentally disabled adults, and the elderly who may be physically or financially abused, neglected, or exploited. Upon receipt of a referral, APS sends a social worker to make a home visit or contact the elder or dependent adult.
    • 24-Hour Hotline: 800-277-7866 or 661-868-1006
  • Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program investigates elder abuse complaints in long-term care facilities and in residential care facilities for the elderly. The primary responsibility of the program is to investigate and endeavor to resolve complaints made by, or on behalf of, individual residents in these facilities, including nursing homes, residential care facilities for the elderly, and assisted living facilities. The goal of the program is to advocate for the rights of all residents in long term care.
    • Phone: 661-323-7884

———

MEDIA COVERAGE

‘Judicial emergency’ results in lack of justice for Kern County residents

February 26, 2020 | 10:28 am


The Central Valley’s federal district court has instituted a “judicial emergency” order due to a shortage of judges, and thousands of Kern County residents — including clients of Chain | Cohn | Stiles — are being left with a feeling of injustice.

Federal Judge Dale A. Drozd of the U.S. Eastern District Court of California, the federal judicial district that includes Bakersfield and the southern Central Valley area, stated that the judicial emergency order “will seriously hinder the administration of justice” in the district.

“These are uncharted waters for this court,” Drozd wrote in his order. “The emergency procedures … are being implemented reluctantly.”

The district, which serves 8 million Californians is supposed to have six full-time judges — three in Fresno and three in Sacramento, said Matt Clark, senior partner and personal injury lawyer with Chain | Cohn | Stiles. But in the past two months, three judges in Fresno have assumed reduced work status or inactive status. Drozd will now be presiding over some 1,050 civil actions and 625 criminal cases.

“We have one judge” in Fresno, Clark told The Bakersfield Californian. “We are the single most impacted district in the country.”

For media coverage, see the links below.

The emergency is already affecting hundreds of local cases and local families, possibly thousands. They include:

Joan Johnson has penned letters to local elected officials, including House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy and Lindsey Graham, chairman of the U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary, addressing the judicial emergency. Federal judges are nominated by presidents and confirmed by the U.S. Senate. No judges in the Eastern District have been appointed by President Trump, though Republicans have been the majority party in the Senate since January 2015.

Considering the history of the Eastern District, the shortfall in resources has been foreseen for years. For more than a decade the Judicial Conference of the United States has recommended that the district be authorized for up to six additional judgeships, doubling its current allocation. However, those recommendations have not been acted upon. Considering the history of the Eastern District, the shortfall in resources has been foreseen for years. For more than a decade the Judicial Conference of the United States has recommended that the district be authorized for up to six additional judgeships, doubling its current allocation. However, those recommendations have not been acted upon.

This is the case despite the fact that since the last new district judgeship was created in the Eastern District in 1978, the population of the district has grown from 2.5 million residents to more than 8 million. By contrast, the Northern District of California, which has a similar population, operates with 14 authorized district judges, Drozd said in his order.

“There are over 1,000 civil cases now on hold,” Clark said. “That’s a thousand more families going through the same thing.”

Below is a portion of a letter sent to elected officials by Joan Johnson:

———

My name is Joan M. Johnson.  I am married to William “Lee” Johnson, and together we are the owners of a family trucking business that has been in existence since 1968.

In December 2018, my husband Lee was nearly killed in an explosion at a compressed natural gas fueling station.  He sustained various life-threatening injuries, including a severe traumatic brain injury.  The explosion was so powerful, it leveled the fueling station.  Although Lee ultimately survived, after months of hospitalization and rehabilitation, his injuries have taken their toll.  He still suffers daily, as does our business.

In an effort to recover for our losses, we retained an attorney.  Our attorney filed a lawsuit in Federal Court, in the Eastern District of California, in early 2019.  At the time of the initial scheduling conference, trial was set for May 4, 2021.  Although this was a long way out in the future, it was acceptable, and we had a “light at the end of the tunnel.”

Recently, our attorney has informed us of the judicial emergency in the Eastern District, as a result of Congress’ inability to appoint any new judges in our district.  I have attached to this letter a copy of the Order in Light of Ongoing Judicial Emergency.  In a nutshell, there is only one judge remaining in the Eastern District, and for the foreseeable future, civil cases, like ours, will be delayed indefinitely.  Our light at the end of the tunnel, it has been extinguished.  The hope for civil justice for my husband’s life-changing injuries, and our business losses, has been delayed indefinitely.

As I understand it, our case could proceed efficiently, if everyone was in agreement with having a federal magistrate oversee the trial.  We would stipulate to a magistrate, however the defendants in our case will not.  I imagine this is true in most civil cases in our district, because why would a defendant stipulate to a magistrate, and resolve the matter more quickly, when they can simply use this judicial emergency as a reason to delay, delay, delay.

We are not a family to ask much of our government.  In fact, we are quite the opposite.  We serve our Country.  My husband’s father, he was veteran.  My husband Lee, he is a veteran.  My son, he is a veteran too (with three Purple Hearts to show for it).  We believe in giving back, and supporting the Country we love, and the government that keeps it running.  We now respectfully ask that our government help us, and that priority be given to the appointment of judges in the Eastern District of California.

Anything you can do to help alleviate the judicial emergency in the Eastern District would be greatly appreciated.  I never understood the true meaning of “justice delayed, is justice denied,” until now.  Our livelihood, and my husband’s well-being depends on an operating civil justice system.  As the Court said in its Standing Order, this judicial emergency is not “conducive to the fair administration of justice.”  I am certain that there are many families dependent on the fair administration of justice in the Eastern District.

———

If you or someone you know is injured in an accident at the fault of someone else, or injured on the job no matter whose fault it is, contact the attorneys at Chain | Cohn | Stiles by calling (661) 323-4000, or fill out a free consultation form at chainlaw.com.

———

MEDIA COVERAGE

BTuff Magazine Interview: Attorney Matt Clark and the importance of Kern County’s oil industry

February 12, 2020 | 6:00 am


To say the gas and petroleum industries are important for Kern County is an understatement.

In fact, California produces more oil than all but three other states (Texas, North Dakota and Alaska), and Kern County is responsible for more than 80 percent of California’s oil production, according to a Duke University study.

So as proposed new state regulations threaten to wind down petroleum production — and in turn threaten Kern County’s economy and tax base — local oil industry representatives, elected officials, community leaders, advocates, and workers are standing up. And that includes Chain | Cohn | Stiles.

Senior partner and veteran personal injury attorney Matt Clark recently sat down with Bakersfield Tuff (BTuff) Magazine to discuss the importance of the industries locally, and share how Chain | Cohn | Stiles and the local oil industry have worked together over the years. For example, the law firm has represented workers in these industries for much of its 85-year history, and cases have resulted in safer workplaces for oilfield workers.

You can watch the full interview below or on YouTube here.

A recent Kern County Board of Supervisors meeting, where the state’s oil-unfriendly policies were a focus — drew an audience of more than 1,000 industry supporters — the largest crowd convened in recent years for a government proceeding in Bakersfield, according to media reports.

Since the early 20th century, when oil was discovered in western Kern County, the area’s economy has largely centered on oil and gas production. Today, the local oil industry employs about 14,000 people directly, and 30,000 work in associated jobs, according to The Bakersfield Californian. And these industries account for over 30% of Kern County’s assessed property values, according to reports. Those funds pay for public services, including road maintenance, schools, police departments, fire departments, and much more. An industry-funded study by the Los Angeles Economic Development Corp. found that Kern oil production generates $925 million in state and local oil revenues per year and $1.6 billion in labor income.

California officials recently invited Kern County representatives to participate in preparing for an inevitable economic transition they said would take into account the county’s dependence on oil production. In November last year, the stated cited a goal of achieving “carbon neutrality” by 2045 when it imposed extra layers of permitting scrutiny for the well-stimulation technique known as fracking and placed a temporary ban on high-pressure steam injections, according to reports.

———

If you or someone you know is injured in an accident at the fault of someone else, or injured on the job no matter whose fault it is, contact the attorneys at Chain | Cohn | Stiles by calling (661) 323-4000, or fill out a free consultation form at chainlaw.com.

‘Bored in Bakersfield’ show, Chain | Cohn | Stiles visit famous Wool Growers Restaurant

January 15, 2020 | 11:01 am


It’s a place where Chain | Cohn | Stiles founder Morris Chain and other attorneys at the law firm dined often. Today, Wool Growers Restaurant continues to be a Basque staple in Bakersfield.

In fact, photos of Chain and other veterans of the firm still hang on the restaurant walls, and a sandwich on the menu is named after Morris Chain. So it was only natural for Chain | Cohn | Stiles to join the Bored in Bakersfield show as they highlighted the food and history of this famous restaurant.

Watch the Bored in Bakersfield show below as longtime law firm partners and attorneys David Cohn and Jim Yoro join former Miss Bakersfield Arlene Carrillo and local radio DJ Danny Hill in a visit to Wool Growers.

To learn more about the history of Wool Growers, read below the video, and for more about Chain | Cohn | Stiles’ history and 85-year anniversary last year, go to bit.ly/chainlaw85.

HISTORY OF WOOL GROWERS

Wool Growers is a family restaurant, and as the establishment’s website explains: “Mayie met J.B. Maitia, a bartender, and married him in 1947. They had two children, Jenny and Daniel. In 1954, when Mayie was only 25 years old she and J.B. opened their own restaurant, the Wool Growers Cafe on Sumner Street. Mayie, along with her daughter, Jenny and granddaughter Christiane, is still running the restaurant today.”

The restaurant itself sits in the heart of Old Town Kern, on East 19th Street between Kern and Baker streets. It offers traditional Basque family-style dining, and is an authentic example of how hard-working shepherds dined. The Spanish shepherd community — originally from Pyrenees region of Spain — sprang up in Kern County in the late 1800s and found they could support stable industries such as grain and sheep farming, according to KCET, PBS. Today, Bakersfield has the second-largest expat Basque community in the U.S., second to Boise, Idaho.

Over the years, the family has helped those who immigrated to Bakersfield from Basque country by employing them at the restaurant, and contributes to our local community in many ways.

“The walls of local restaurants are lined with memorabilia documenting this history, and proprietors often share colorful stories as they mix up a fresh batch of drinks or deliver a bowl of piping hot cabbage soup,” according to KCET.

Wool Growers serves ample portions, beginning with an initial spread that is dubbed the “set-up,” which includes a cabbage-based soup, hearty baked beans, and a spicy tomato sauce. Fresh-baked bread, green salad, and fresh tomato salad with red onion and balsamic vinegar is also provided. Daily specials include roast lamb, roast tri-tip with spaghetti, garlic fried chicken, and roast pork loin with mashed potatoes. Fans rave about the perfectly-cooked French fries.

As for the Morris B. Chain Sandwich, it is served with tri-tip or lamb, and loaded with garlic.

“Morris had a reputation for being one of the great connoisseur of really good food,” Cohn said on the Bored in Bakersfield episode. “He loved to come to the Wool Growers and he could never get enough garlic … If you like garlic, you’ll be in garlic heaven.”

Today, it’s a place where all of Bakersfield can sit and dine together

“You really can’t beat the ambiance this establishment provides,” said attorney Jim Yoro. “Where else can you go in Bakersfield and see in one table half the judges from the superior court, and in another table half the farmers in the southern San Joaquin Valley, and in another table a bunch of oilfield executives? And we all eat together.”

———

If you or someone you know is injured in an accident at the fault of someone else, or injured on the job no matter whose fault it is, contact the attorneys at Chain | Cohn | Stiles by calling (661) 323-4000, or fill out a free consultation form at chainlaw.com.

‘Real People, Real Results’: Clients reunite with their attorneys to share life-changing experience

October 30, 2019 | 6:00 am


For the 85th anniversary of Chain | Cohn | Stiles, we reunited clients with the attorneys who helped them following life-changing accidents, and interviewed them on camera about their experience.

The result was a new video series titled “Real People. Real Results.”

In the videos, one client provides a testimonial about her experience in hiring attorney David Cohn after she suffered severe injuries from a staircase collapse in her apartment complex. In another testimonial, a father and son shared how lawyer Matt Clark changed their lives for the better after the father suffered injuries when a big rig crashed into his car. You can watch their testimonials by clicking their videos below:

You can also get a more in-depth look from one of the clients, Kimmy, (below) about her experiences with Chain | Cohn | Stiles, in her own words.

“At Chain | Cohn | Stiles, we pride ourselves on our unwavering commitment to all of our clients,” said David Cohn, managing partner of the law firm. “When handling sensitive cases with distraught clients, we take it upon ourselves to treat our clients not simply as case numbers, but as our own loved ones in times of need.”

Besides the new “Real People” videos, you can read real-life reviews left by clients on various Chain | Cohn | Stiles pages by visiting the law firm’s “Reviews & Testimonials” webpage, and learn more about the 85th anniversary of Chain | Cohn | Stiles at bit.ly/chainlaw85.

 

KIMMY’S STORY

On choosing Chain | Cohn | Stiles

I had talked to a couple other attorneys first, but (David Cohn) was real cut and dry, and never seemed misleading. He wasn’t trying to schmooze me. I felt like he was honest, he was friendly, and wasn’t trying to “B-S” me, because that’s what happens a lot of times with attorneys.”

On visiting the law office

The office is amazing, and clean. The front desk clerks are always really friendly, always smiling. From front to back, the staff is awesome. And that was from the very first meeting with the investigator, to all the employees I had phone calls with.

On communication with the law firm

It’s hard when you’re not able to work, and do all the things you want to do when you’re injured. I have come in ranting for 5 minutes or 2 hours, and the office employees never once lost composure, never once gave me bad attitude. They were always understanding. They were always very supportive always very friendly, and tried to be as accommodating as they could possibly to whatever was happening to me.

On working with David Cohn

He was a motivator for me to do everything better in life, not just this case. I just want him to know that it wasn’t just through this case that he served me, it is also my life because he challenged me, and I have stepped up to my promises to him, and myself. And it has made me a better person. I don’t want to let him down, not even in the future because I have so much respect for him. I have recommended him multiple times. There’s no case too big or to small — he treats everyone the same.

———

If you or someone you know is injured in an accident, please call the attorneys at Chain | Cohn | Stiles at (661) 323-4000, or chat with us online at chainlaw.com.

Chain | Cohn | Stiles sponsors scholarships during annual ‘El Grito’ ceremony in downtown Bakersfield

September 25, 2019 | 6:00 am


Hundreds came together on Sept. 15 at the Liberty Bell in front of Kern County Superior Court to celebrate the annual “El Grito de Dolores,” a major celebration in Mexico that marks the country’s fight for independence against Spanish rule.

The evening included folkloric dancers, mariachi and banda music groups, and a scholarship recognition ceremony led by a representative from Chain | Cohn | Stiles honoring 16 Kern County students and scholarship recipients. Learn more about the scholarship program below.

The featured entertainment included Sonora Explosiva, Banda Orgullosa, Mariachi Toro’s de Mexico, Brian Anaya (La Vox Kids), Ballet Folklorico Huaztecalli, Floreo de Soga and more. Other attractions included face painting by Fabulous Faces by Nallely! and a street fair with food vendors and informational booths.

The celebration also included a live feed from the Mexican city of Dolores where President Andrés Manuel López Obrador led a reenactment of El Grito. Mexican Independence Day is Sept. 16. The Grito, which occurred in the small Mexican town of Dolores, was the rallying call made by a Roman Catholic priest in front of his church to the battle against Spain.

The was the seventh year of El Grito celebration in Bakersfield, organized by the Kern County Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and the Kern County Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Business Education Foundation, which includes foundation chairman and Chain | Cohn | Stiles marketing director Jorge Barrientos.

 

SCHOLARSHIPS

The Bakersfield accident, injury and workers’ compensation law firm Chain | Cohn | Stiles each year sponsors student scholarships presented during El Grito celebration. This year, joining Chain | Cohn | Stiles in funding scholarships was Kern Schools Federal Credit Union, Rabobank, Valley Republic Bank, Beautiful You Medical Aesthetics, and XM Garcia Law.

The sponsors, in partnership with the Kern County Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Business Education Foundation, awarded 16-$250 scholarships to local students in pursuit of higher education, and who are giving back in various ways to our community. This year, the foundation received more than 250 applications from students throughout Kern County.

“We were thoroughly impressed by the students’ dedication to education, community service, and promising future outlook,” said KCHCC Business Education Foundation chairman Jorge Barrientos. “Many of them are first-generation U.S. students, and the first to attend a university in their families. Some of them are even DREAMers, pursuing their dreams regardless of obstacles in their way. We award scholarships to help them pursue their educational goals.”

Here are this year’s student scholarship recipients:

  • Carlos Alberto Aguilar
  • Christopher Aldaco
  • Monica Ascencio
  • Rafael Castellanos
  • Jazmin Jimenez Castro
  • Serina Ishida
  • Destiny Jimenez
  • Alondra Macario
  • Nancy Maldonado
  • Karen Martinez
  • Angel Daniel Mendoza
  • Audrie Michael
  • Andres Ramirez
  • Guadalupe Sanchez
  • Nimsy Soto
  • Omar Vences Vergara

———

If you or someone you know is injured in an accident, please call the attorneys at Chain | Cohn | Stiles at (661) 323-4000, or chat with us online at chainlaw.com.

Chain | Cohn | Stiles attorney Beatriz Trejo honored by ‘Latinas Leading the Way’

July 24, 2019 | 6:00 am


Beatriz Trejo, associate attorney with Chain | Cohn | Stiles, has been honored by the Latina Leaders of Kern County organization as one of the “Latinas Leading the Way.”

Trejo received the award July 20 at the 20th annual Latinas Leading the Way Awards event, honoring professional women who are making a mark in our community.

This year’s slate of honorees represent “the true essence of our organization’s mission,” and are “selected for their exceptional professionalism, achievements and commitment to our community,” according to Latina Leaders of Kern County. They are:

  • Claudia Catota: Chief Diversity Officer and Special Assistant to the President, California State University, Bakersfield
  • Teresa Romero: President, United Farm Workers
  • Beatriz Trejo: Attorney, Chain | Cohn | Stiles

The awards banquet is the nonprofit’s annual fundraiser supporting youth programs, specifically the Youth Leadership Program, where participants learn from key community leaders and experts in local government, education, economic empowerment, politics, and civic engagement.

Latina Leaders of Kern County, itself, was founded by Linda Quioñones-Vaughn in 1998, focusing on the development and empowerment of one of the fastest growing segments of in Kern County — Latinas. It is the mission of the nonprofit “to foster leadership, identify and develop opportunities for Latinas, and to influence key issues affecting our community,” according to the organization.

“We are passionate about continuously looking for opportunities that develop and support Latina Leadership. It is our philosophy to be committed, open minded, and inclusive. Latina Leaders of Kern County is ‘building a stronger community, one leader at a time’.”

Trejo’s biography was included in the event program, and a video of her accomplishments were highlighted as well. You can read her biography below, and you can watch the video by clicking here.

———

Beatriz A. Trejo has been dedicated in her adult life to giving back through her career as an attorney, and in our community.

Beatriz attended Highland High School in Bakersfield before earning her bachelor’s degree in political science from Cal State Bakersfield and her master’s degree in political science from Cal State Northridge. After completing her law degree from the University of Akron School of Law in Ohio, Beatriz returned to her hometown.

Since 2015, she has been representing injured workers through her work as an associate attorney at Chain | Cohn | Stiles, advocating for those who get hurt on the job to receive their rightful benefits and heal. She is a Certified Legal Specialist in Workers’ Compensation and is co-chair of California Applicants’ Attorneys Association (CAAA) Latino Caucus, which seeks to improve workplace conditions for injured Latino workers, educating Latino workers about legal rights, and advocating for public policy in the best interest of Latino workers. She is also the past president of CAAA’s Bakersfield Chapter.

Relatedly, out in our community Beatriz has served on the panels of the Immigration Justice Collaborative, which aims to educate immigrants on their constitutional rights, is a frequent speaker for Kern County Small Business Academies, educating new business owners on work injury laws, and serves on the CSU Bakersfield Pre-Law Advisory Committee, helping aspiring lawyers. You can also find her on local Spanish radio stations discussing important legal issues, and assisting local residents with their legal questions.

For her tireless work, Beatriz has been honored: Awards include:

  • Workers’ Compensation Young Lawyer of the Year” award by the California State Bar.
  • Selectee in the Super Lawyers “Rising Stars” list by Southern California Super Lawyers Magazine, awarded to just 2.5% of lawyers under the age of 40 in the Southern California region. As part of the program, she was also selected to the “The Top Women Attorneys in Southern California — Rising Stars” list.
  • Top Attorneys” selectee as voted on by local lawyers, highlighting the best lawyers in their areas.
  • 2018 “20 Under 40 People to Watch” by Bakersfield Life Magazine.

Outside of the office, Beatriz has engulfed herself in our community serving on board of directors for charities, speaking to students, and paving the way for Latina girls in Kern County. She served as the keynote speaker for the 2017 CSU Bakersfield “Chicano Commencement Celebration.” She is a member of Latina Leaders of Kern County, and planning committee for the Comprehensive Blood and Cancer Center Foundation for Community Wellness’ Cancer Run – a cause that’s near and dear to her heart since her father passed away of cancer in 2016, and mom diagnosed with breast cancer.

———

If you or someone you know is hurt on the job, or hurt in an accident at the fault of someone else, please contact lawyers at Chain | Cohn | Stiles at (661) 323-4000, or visit the website chainlaw.com for more information.

———

*NOTICE: Making a false or fraudulent Workers’ Compensation claim is a felony subject to up to 5 years in a prison or a fine up to $150,000 or double the value of the fraud, whichever is greater, or by both imprisonment and fine.